Voip for blind people – Team Talk 5

Open source Voip for visually impaired!

Team Talk 5 review

TeamTalk is VOIP conferencing system that people use to communicate using VoIP and/or video streaming. The part with video streaming puzzles me as the program has community made of mostly blind people. They can log in with a simple tt document and converse easily with their contacts. The project is open source and using open source solutions for most of its functionality.

Functionality

  • Audio and video transfer with VOIP
  • Public and private channel creation
  • Sharing of desktop aplications
  • File sharing
  • Standalone server

Installation

The TeamTalk 5 conferencing system is composed of a client and hosted server. Most users will just need to install the client application, unless of coarse they want to have their own TeamTalk 5 server.
When installing the application on Windows, the visually impaired users, should install “TeamTalk 5 Classic. It is the client with better accessibility, since the Classic version works smoother with screen readers. There is also a regular TeamTalk 5 client developed for the masses.

Open Source

TeamTalk is a freeware. The program can be found on a lot of popular software websites. Its license permits, to be run on numerous clients or servers, it can be also redistributed free of charge. A permit must be nevertheless bought by developers that want to implement or use the code in third party programs.

TeamTalk client software have been build around the GitHub project TeamTalk5. The TeamTalk server is not part of the project and is therefore not publicly available.

Availability

The TeamTalk 5 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X, and the most used Linux distributions – Debian, CentOS, and Raspbian. The server and client applications run on the same platforms. The only difference being that the client additionally supports the mobile platforms of iOS and Android.

Encoding

For voice encoding TeamTalk uses the open source audio and video codecs. For the audio codecs it uses Speex and OPUS. And for the video stream encoding the program is relaying on WebM video codec.

Leave a Reply